Earth Observatory Blog

Submitted on 20 Nov 2017 by:

Scientists have long known that Myammar is tectonically vulnerable. But only recently, says Dr Paramesh Banerjee, have they been able to understand the full extent of the country’s seismic activity. 

This new insight is made possible by the new Myanmar Seismic Network (MSN), established earlier this year. The network comprises 30 broadband seismometers, scattered throughout the country from the northernmost Kachin state, all the way to the Tenasserim Division in the south.

Dr Banerjee, Technical Director at the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS), led a team who built the network in collaboration with the Myanmar Earthquake Committee, and the Department of Meteorology and Hydrology in Myanmar.

The entire project took one year to complete–Dr Banerjee’s team began...

Submitted on 21 Sep 2017 by:

“We scientists usually think we know everything,” said Dr Wang Yu, a Research Fellow at the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS), “but when we go into the field, we start to realise that actually farmers have most of the important knowledge about the land, and that we are just visitors with lots to learn.”

Dr Wang Yu led a group of scientists and students during an earthquake geology training workshop in Myanmar and Thailand in February 2017. The workshop was designed to educate students with no prior field experience about active fault trenching and paleoseismology by investigating the fault rupture from the 2011 Tarlay earthquake.

Geologists employ a wide range of methodologies to do their work. Besides traditional scientific research and written records or...

Submitted on 13 Sep 2017 by:

One of the things that first made me interested in geology was hearing about the number of places that geologists travel to for work.  As an undergraduate student at the University of Oregon, I learned that professors in the Department of Geological Sciences conducted research in exotic places such as Hawaii, Greenland, Antarctica, and Central Asia.

Fortunately, with some hard work, good decisions, and a bit of luck I have been able to travel to many places during my career as an earthquake geologist. In addition to my home base of California, where I manage the Fault Mapping and Zonation Program at the California Geological Survey, I have worked in...

Submitted on 08 Sep 2017 by:

In February 2017, scientists from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) led an earthquake geology training camp in Myanmar and Thailand.

A diverse group of geology students – hailing from Thailand, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, China, and the USA – joined the training course led by Dr Wang Yu, a Research Fellow at EOS, and Visiting Professor Ray Weldon from the University of Oregon.

The course was designed to allow scientists to share their knowledge about active fault trenching and paleoseismology with geology students who may not have had prior field experience.

Central to this training course was the idea that scientists and students from Southeast Asia countries could be equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge so that...