Nepal

Post-Disaster Damage Assessments: Room for Improvement?

On 25 April 2015, a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, destroying buildings and infrastructure across 31 of Nepal’s 70 districts. Approximately 9,000 people lost their lives to the earthquake that day, 22,000 suffered from injuries, and eight million were affected. I arrived in Kathmandu one week after the quake to support the government of Nepal in various response and recovery activities.

Annual Report 2016 - Research

Nepal is the home to stunning landscapes and the tallest mountain range in the world. It is also the site of the largest active continental thrust fault called the Main Frontal Thrust. The collision of the Indian subcontinent and the Eurasian plate, which began about 50 million years ago, is still building the tallest mountains in the world and has produced many large, catastrophic earthquakes along the way.

Annual Report 2016

Nepal is the home to stunning landscapes and the tallest mountain range in the world. It is also the site of the largest active continental thrust fault called the Main Frontal Thrust. The collision of the Indian subcontinent and the Eurasian plate, which began about 50 million years ago, is still building the tallest mountains in the world and has produced many large, catastrophic earthquakes along the way.

The Ratu River Expedition Bags Awards at Film Festivals

The Ratu River Expedition, a documentary on earthquakes in Nepal, has won several awards at film festivals around the world. Most recently, the 25-minute film won a Platinum Remi prize at the WorldFest-Houston International Film and Video Festival held in April 2016. It also been screened in more than 10 film festivals worldwide.

Tapponnier and his team are searching for past earthquakes in Nepal to determine what kinds of earthquakes may threaten Kathmandu in the next decades.

The Urban Reconstruction in Nepal Project studies the strategies being used to rebuild urban settlements destroyed by the 2015 earthquake in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

Reducing Natural Disaster Risk Across Asia

Asia and the Pacific are most at risk from natural disasters, according to a report from the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction. More than 90 million people worldwide were affected by natural disasters in 2015. Asia is the world’s most disaster-prone continent, with 152 out of the 346 reported disasters worldwide. This isn’t surprising, given that it is both geologically active and the most populous region on Earth. In the last few decades, earthquakes, tsunamis, and typhoons were among the deadliest natural hazards in the world. In 2015, earthquakes topped the list; the magnitude-7.8 Nepal earthquake in April claimed more than 8,000 lives, causing widespread damage in Gorkha and its surrounding areas. Earlier this year, the earthquake in Taiwan saw more than a hundred casualties, almost all from a shoddily constructed apartment building that collapsed in the quake.

One major issue addressed here is to know whether the recent great earthquakes on the MFT ruptured the surface or not.

This project aims to study the MFT and its associated fault splays by acquiring a densely-spaced set of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles across the fault tip in order to assess the geometry and kinematics of the fault.

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