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Powerful Twin Quakes Strike Southern California

On 5 July 2019 at 1.33am (Singapore time), a Mw 6.4 earthquake struck the town of Ridgecrest in California. Its seismic waves could be felt from Los Angeles to San Jose. Nearly a day and a half later, on 6 July at 11.19am (Singapore time), a more powerful Mw 7.1 quake struck the same region. Because the Mw 7.1 earthquake is the largest event so far in this sequence, it is considered to be the mainshock. The events leading up to it, which include the Mw 6.4 quake, are considered to be foreshocks.

800 Million Tons of Blue Carbon Lie Buried in US Tidal Wetlands

Tidal wetlands in the contiguous US can store roughly 800 million tons of carbon in their soils. That is the latest estimate from a team of over 30 scientists, including Professor Benjamin Horton and Dr Tim Shaw from the Earth Observatory of Singapore and the Asian School of the Environment, published on 21 June 2018 in Nature Scientific Reports.

New York City at Risk of Flooding Every Decade - Climate Study Shows

Our Earth is warming. In fact, the planet’s average temperature has risen by 0.6°C over the past century, and is projected to rise another 2 to 6°C over the next hundred years. Small changes in the average temperature of the planet can translate to large and potentially dangerous shifts in climate and weather.

The Holocene sea-level database for the Atlantic coast of the United States contains 492 index points, which locate the position of relative sea level (RSL) in time and space, and 344 limitin

AGU 2016 - The World's Largest Meeting of Earth and Space Science Experts

Last December, a big contingent from the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) travelled to the American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference, the largest gathering of earth and space scientists in the world. Around 24,000 people descended upon San Francisco to catch up with colleagues, present their research, and learn about the latest advancements in their fields.

Our Year in Review

In March, we kicked off the EOS Institutional Blog. Our goal – create a space for you to learn more about what our scientists and teams are up to. As I look back on the stories we shared covering new research, current hazardous activity in the region, and outreach events, I’m thrilled to have the Institutional Blog as a reminder of the great work we’ve done and the fruitful year we’ve had.

Owing to recent advances in observational methods and modeling techniques, the development of physical models of the seismic cycle with predictive power may seem at reach in a foreseeabl

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