Holocene Sea-level Databases

Projections of future RSL change can be improved with a better understanding of how RSL has changed since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Regional sea-level databases are effective tools for showing the magnitude, rate, spatial variability, and driving mechanisms of past RSL. Trends contained within the datasets can also provide information on the timing and contribution of past ice sheets to GMSL since the LGM. In conjunction with GIA modelling, databases can constrain key components of RSL change during the Holocene. We follow the standardized procedures, established by the HOLSEA working group, to develop databases for key regions. We are producing databases for key regions, which include Southeast Asia, the Indian Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Belize, and the Russian Arctic. These databases include a combination of existing revaluated data, as well as previously unpublished datasets, and will be used to address the following research questions:

  • How has RSL changed since the LGM?
  • What were the relative contributions from past ice sheets to RSL since the LGM?
  • What are the key mechanisms driving the spatial variability in RSL change during the Holocene?
 

Funding Sources: 

  • Earth Observatory of Singapore

Project Years: 

2018
2019
2020
2021

EOS Team: 

Principal Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator
Co-Investigator

Collaborators: 

Nicole Khan, Department of Earth Science, Hong Kong University
Gösta Hoffmann, Department of Geology, University of Bonn
Sarah Woodroofe, Department of Geography, Durham University
Jemma Finch, Department of Geography, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Lauren Pretorius, Department of Geography, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Rory Flood, Department of Environmental Change and Resilience, Queen’s University Belfast
Robert Barnett, Department of Geography, University of Exeter
Alisa Baranskaya, Department of Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University