Communications

 
 

The Community Engagement Office aims to build the identity of the Observatory beyond the scientific community, reaching government and leadership, educators, partners, and the media. This is achieved by elevating our scientists’ research and expressing the importance of Earth science awareness through both local and international media, and through the Observatory’s social channels.

Blog

“Five things to know about Disaster Risk Reduction ”

click to close

[title_1]

Earthquakes, typhoons, volcanic eruptions and floods are some of the hazards we live with. But we can lessen the impacts of these hazards on our lives and livelihoods by following Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) strategies. These strategies help societies prepare and respond to hazards, and therefore reduce the associated risks. DRR can happen at all levels, from individual actions to international agreements.

Disaster risk was the focal point of the APRU-IRIDeS Multi-Hazards Virtual Summer School 2020. Held over three days on 15, 22, and 22 July 2020, the summer school was organised by the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU) and the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS).

Usually held at Tohoku University and involving lectures and field trips, this year’s summer school was held online due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Assistant Professor David Lallemant, a...

“Why Back-to-Back Typhoons are Common for Southeast Asia”

click to close

[title_1]

Typhoon Goni (Rolly in the Philippines) caused more than 20 fatalities in the Philippines earlier this month. Just a few days later, Typhoon Vamco (Ulysses) struck the Philippines again, then Vietnam on the other side of the South China Sea. “It is fairly common for more than one storm to occur in an ocean basin at the same time”, said Associate Professor Adam Switzer, a Principal Investigator at the Earth Observatory of Singapore. “Since typhoon season in Asia runs into the new year, there is unfortunately a real chance of further storms in the region before the end of 2020”, Assoc Prof Switzer added.

Typhoons form under specific sets of conditions between the ocean and the atmosphere. For example, warm sea surface temperature and humid atmosphere favour typhoon formation (cyclogenesis). As these conditions are easily met in Southeast Asia, the region is prone to frequent typhoons. In fact, “in the...

“The Earth has Lost 28 Trillion Tonnes of Ice in Less than 30 Years – New Report Sparks Concerns for Sea-Level Rise in Southeast Asia”

click to close

[title_1]

In conversation with Fangyi Tan, PhD student, Sea Level Research team at the Earth Observatory of Singapore

 

1. Will melting ice sheets in such quantities pose a threat to Southeast Asia in the future? 

recent study found that the Earth has lost a staggering 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017. The scientists commented in a related news article that the melting of glaciers and ice sheets could cause sea levels to rise by as much as a metre by the end of this century.

One metre may not sound like a lot, but there is a positive feedback when we melt ice. Ice is very reflective; when we melt ice and replace the reflective surface with a darker surface that absorbs more heat, this leads to greater...

Media

We work with the media to provide expert commentary on topics including earth science phenomena, geohazard crises, and new research findings.

To learn more about the Earth Observatory of Singapore in the news, please visit our newsroom.

To view a curated collection of Earth Observatory researchers in the news, please go to our media archive.

Social Channels

Follow us on social media for stories, photos, and updates.

Outreach Events

We share our science and connect with our audience at various outreach events, from on-site tours to conferences to public exhibitions.