Communications

 
 

The Community Engagement Office aims to build the identity of the Observatory beyond the scientific community, reaching government and leadership, educators, partners, and the media. This is achieved by elevating our scientists’ research and expressing the importance of Earth science awareness through both local and international media, and through the Observatory’s social channels.

Blog

“The Earth has Lost 28 Trillion Tonnes of Ice in Less than 30 Years – New Report Sparks Concerns for Sea-Level Rise in Southeast Asia”

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In conversation with Fangyi Tan, PhD student, Sea Level Research team at the Earth Observatory of Singapore

 

1. Will melting ice sheets in such quantities pose a threat to Southeast Asia in the future? 

recent study found that the Earth has lost a staggering 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017. The scientists commented in a related news article that the melting of glaciers and ice sheets could cause sea levels to rise by as much as a metre by the end of this century.

One metre may not sound like a lot, but there is a positive feedback when we melt ice. Ice is very reflective; when we melt ice and replace the reflective surface with a darker surface that absorbs more heat, this leads to greater...

“Volcanic Soundscape: How Seismic Sounds Can Reveal Eruption Secrets”

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When a volcano erupts in the darkness of night, or when it is blanketed by clouds, determining even the most basic information about the plume can be very difficult. Particularly for air safety, information like the time the eruption started, the height of the plume, and the eruption duration are crucial for determining what air spaces will be impacted.

Published on 15 September 2020, in the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, is a study I led that developed a new method to estimate plume heights. This method utilises the long-travelling low-frequency sound waves produced by the eruptions.

Infrasound, or sound that falls below 20 Hz, can travel thousands of kilometers and carry with it information about an eruption. It’s truly fascinating because if you think about it, infrasound is just sound. The only difference is that humans can’t hear it. And yet within that...

“Why We Need to Learn What We Can About Powerful Earthquakes”

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In conversation with Assistant Professor Aron Meltzner, Principal Investigator at the Earth Observatory of Singapore

 

1. How does the recent powerful magnitude-7.8 earthquake in Alaska remind us of similar hazards in Southeast Asia?

Last week, we saw a powerful earthquake off the coast of Alaska with a magnitude of 7.8 which had the potential to trigger a damaging tsunami, but fortunately this did not happen.

It occurred along a subduction zone where the Pacific Plate is subducting or slipping under the North American plate. The shaking that we know as an earthquake results from the sudden movement between these two plates, but that sudden movement also has the potential to lift up the seafloor, which in turns lifts the water above it, and that can cause a tsunami.

Whilst the tsunami this time was small, in 1964 there was a much bigger earthquake of magnitude-9.2 that produced a devastating tsunami that went across the Pacific Ocean and...

Media

We work with the media to provide expert commentary on topics including earth science phenomena, geohazard crises, and new research findings.

To learn more about the Earth Observatory of Singapore in the news, please visit our newsroom.

To view a curated collection of Earth Observatory researchers in the news, please go to our media archive.

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Outreach Events

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